Thursday, December 16, 2010

scarface



The maddening thing about kids is that they don't understand that when you pick at a scab, it won't heal. Mack got this scrape on his forehead almost two weeks ago, tripping in the driveway. Given how vascularized the face is, this should have healed at least a week ago--maybe even less, it was such a small abrasion. Instead, he picked and picked and picked at it until it was all bleeding and oozy, and it was only through extreme distraction and a dose of hypnosis that I was able to keep a Band-Aid on, just to keep his hands out of the way. Of course, he can easily rip the Band-Aid off, it's just a matter of distracting him long enough that he forgets he has the Band-Aid on in the first place. It's either that, or he's going to look like Mikhail Gorbachev.




(YES, I'm aware that Mikhail Gorbachev has a port wine stain or nevus flammeus, not a scar, thank you, MEDICAL STUDENTS OF EARTH. Of which my sister is one, so I am therefore free to make fun of you guys! But with love!)

I have seriously considered bringing home a Tegarderm or some sort of mega-adhesive to foil Mack's attempts to rip off his dressings, but unfortunately his scrape is a little too close to the hairline. I have also considered getting one of those dog cones. (This possibility is still under consideration.)


18 comments:

  1. Ha ha...I vote against the dog cone, for what it's worth.
    I have a 4 month old who is just discovering the wonder of his hands. Oh boy am I in for it!

    ReplyDelete
  2. Wait am I missing something? Why do you not want to use tegarderm near the hairline?

    ReplyDelete
  3. Anonymous12:41 AM

    What about sticky Vaseline or Polysporin caked on so thick that he won't bother digging into the scab? Or do young boys enjoy picking at sticky goop?
    - Another Michelle

    ReplyDelete
  4. House: because I don't want it to get stuck in his hair.

    Anonymous: I did antibiotic ointment for a few days but then the wound was so wet and boggy that it started to look worse. Since then I've been subscribing to the dermatologist's mantra: if it's too dry, make it wet; if it's too wet, make it dry.

    ReplyDelete
  5. Anonymous8:04 AM

    just face it you have a dirty, grimey, nose-picking, bug eating, scab picking little boy and no matter what you ever try he is gonna still find a way to pick at the scab (and maybe even snack on it). You gotta love it!!

    ReplyDelete
  6. Anonymous6:19 PM

    As a total aside - loving the shovel-in method he's using in the top picture. A man after my own heart.

    ReplyDelete
  7. Anonymous12:09 PM

    I do not like the cone of shame!!!

    ReplyDelete
  8. I was hiding under your porch because I love you.

    ReplyDelete
  9. Vicky3:15 PM

    yes! cone of shame!

    ReplyDelete
  10. No solution to offer, sadly.

    Maybe a bribe?

    I think the dog cone is a good thought, however, he'll still be able to reach the abrasion. Tegaderm would be the way to go, or some other occlusive dressing.

    ReplyDelete
  11. Anonymous11:34 PM

    Just came across this Q&A on another blog - cited as from May 2010, Canadian Journal of Diagnosis.

    - Another Michelle

    ****************************************

    Should all skin abrasions be covered immediately after cleaning to prevent infection? Many doctors recommend leaving wounds open to dry out. Submitted by: Mitch Rubin, MD, Vancouver, British Columbia

    Skin abrasions should be covered not to prevent infection but to promote faster healing. The idea to leave wounds open to the air to heal is an old one that has been superseded by the promotion of the concept of moist wound healing. Multiple studies have shown that enhanced wound reepithelialization occurs under occlu- sive dressings. Moisture retentive dressings have been shown to provide an optimal envi- ronment to accelerate healing by promoting tissue growth. Concerns that occluding a wound would lead to infection have been found to be incorrect. In the case of skin abrasions, treatment with a film such as OpsiteTM or TegadermTM or a hydrocolloid dressing would be helpful in pro- moting faster wound healing without promoting infection of the wound. Answered by: Dr. Richard Haber

    ReplyDelete
  12. Anonymous11:35 PM

    Oops, short term memory - I found the link from artdoc's blog (which I just followed via the comment section here!)

    - Another Michelle

    ReplyDelete
  13. Anonymous6:45 AM

    Hi, my name is Dug the dog.

    ReplyDelete
  14. Haber has a very popular compounding drugstore North of St. Clair on Bathurst St. too!

    Maybe you can cut the Tegaderm to avoid his hairline? :)

    ReplyDelete